Environment in Asia

Apr 04

Judith Shapiro, "As China Goes, So Goes the Planet: Domestic and International Implications of China's Environmental Crisis"

4:15pm

Location: 

CGIS Knafel Building, Room K262, 1737 Cambridge Street, Harvard University

As China Goes, So Goes the Planet: Domestic and International Implications of China's Environmental Crisis
Judith Shapiro, American University

Oct 30

T. R. Kidder, "Greater than All of the Forces of Nature? Humans as Agents of China’s Environmental Change 5000-2000 Years Ago"

4:15pm

Location: 

CGIS South, Doris and Ted Lee Gathering Room (S030), 1730 Cambridge Street, Harvard University

Greater than All of the Forces of Nature? Humans as Agents of China’s Environmental Change 5000-2000 Years Ago and Its Relevance for the Modern World
T. R. Kidder,
Washington University, St. Louis

Humans are the leading cause of environmental change today. The Anthropocene hypothesis suggests we now have a greater effect on the environment than all of the forces of nature. While the Anthropocene is often claimed to start ca. 1750 CE, evidence shows that these changes began considerably earlier in China. Using multiple lines of evidence from the Yellow River region, T. R. Kidder explore how early Chinese civilizations manipulated their environments and the ways these changes contributed to the collapse of Western Han. This analysis provides a perspective on contemporary environmental change in China and elsewhere.

Apr 22

Ts'ui-jung Liu, "Climate Changes and Water Resources: The Case of Taiwan "

4:15pm

Location: CGIS Knafel Building, Room K262, 1737 Cambridge Street, Harvard University

Climate Changes and Water Resources: The Case of Taiwan
Ts’ui-jung Liu,
Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica

Water is essential to life and central to the welfare and sustainable development of society. The movement of the water cycle, also known as the hydraulic cycle, is sensitive to climate change. Ts’ui-jung Liu will give a general description of climatic conditions and water resources in Taiwan and then focus on climatic disasters caused by typhoons and droughts. Ts’ui-jung will discuss how people utilized water resources and produced wastewater, as well as controlled pollution, during these disasters.