Postdoctoral Fellows

Maura Dykstra

Maura Dykstra

An Wang Postdoctoral Fellow
Ph.D., 2014, University of California, Los Angeles, History
Maura Dykstra will revise her dissertation “Complicated Matters: Commercial Dispute Resolution in Chongqing, 1750-1911” for publication. This project examines the history of shifting mediation strategies employed by merchants litigating commercial disputes in the commercial center of Chongqing. It offers new perspectives on the incorporation of Sichuan into the Qing Empire in the eighteenth century, local state-building in the nineteenth century, and the central legal reforms of the early twentieth century that laid the foundation for the governance of commerce in the modern Chinese state.  
Alanna Krolikowski

Alanna Krolikowski

Princeton-Harvard China and the World Fellow
Ph.D. 2013, University of Toronto, Political Science
Through analysis of aircraft manufacturing and space, Alanna Krolikowski explores why some Chinese high-technology sectors are transnationally integrated while others are sites of interstate competition.  

Xiaojun Li

Xiaojun Li

Princeton-Harvard China and the World Fellow
Ph.D., 2013, Stanford University, Political Science
Xiaojun Li will revise his dissertation, “The Political Economy of Trade Protection in post-Reform China” for publication. This project focuses on the domestic politics of China’s trade policies in the post-reform era. It suggests that domestic groups in nondemocratic regimes have a greater impact on trade policies than is often recognized by conventional wisdom.  
Paul Vierthaler

Paul Vierthaler

An Wang Postdoctoral Fellow
Ph.D., 2014, Yale University, East Asian Languages and Literatures
Paul Vierthaler will revise his dissertation “Quasi-History and Public Knowledge: A Social History of Unofficial Historical Narratives in Late-Ming and Early-Qing China” for publication. This project defines a class of narrative historical story-telling texts, quasi-history, as they existed in sixteenth and seventeenth century China. It offers a better understanding of quasi-history, and yeshi in particular, in the context of late-Imperial Chinese literature.